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LA CITADELLE LAFERRIERE

The creators of the Citadelle Laferrière had very creative approach to its appearance. This is not a box-shaped boring construction, but an embodiment of unlimited human imagination. Depending from the angle the Citadelle has different shapes. If the visitors are approaching it by the main trail, leading to the top of the mountain, Citadelle’s appearance resembles the prow of a great stone ship jutting out of the mountain.


A Must Visit When In Haiti


The Citadelle Laferrière is a mountaintop fortress, located on the northern coast of Haiti - on the top of mountain Bonnet a L’Eveque.

Depicted on local currency, stamps and postcards, this amazing structure has become the symbol of Haiti’s power and independence. It was built in the beginning of the 19th century by one of the leaders of Haiti’s slave revolution.

The Citadelle Laferrière is also known simply as the Citadelle or as Citadelle Henri Christophe in the honor of its creator.


The Citadelle is referred by locals as the Eighth Wonder of the World and in 1982 it was nominated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This massive stone construction is the largest fortress in the Americas. Built to demonstrate the power of the newly independent Haiti, the Citadelle Laferrière was essential for the security of Haiti’s newly formed state.


The fortress was built for enabling the king to use the so-called scorched earth tactics, i.e. in case of French attack the surrounding territory would be burnt in fire and the local population, the army and the king would find shelter in the unconquerable Citadelle.


This massive stone construction was outfitted with 365 cannons of varying size and an enormous stockpile of cannon balls that still can be found in different corners of the Citadelle even today.


The cannons were obtained from different monarchs. Today the iron and bronze cannons are still pointing out of the Citadelle’s windows and the visitors of the Citadelle can still see the royal crests of famous European monarchs of 18th century on the cannons.



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